Tilt Cove

 

Great Park, Must Visit!

Great Park, TC reminded me how I like walking in the Burnaby Central Park.

Tilt Cove

 

When I first came to Canada in 2003, I didn’t know what to expect. I’d seen several films from Hollywood but never made any connections between Canada and the U.S. I had not even seen one photo of any Canadian landscape, let alone shots of its people and cities.

Growing up in a big city in China, I remember vividly about the nature disappearing in front of my eyes. Taller buildings get built, less trees blossom in the spring. More people are on the streets, slowly, the forest I used to play in disappeared into a parking lot, and old residences turned into shopping malls.

China is no doubt growing at an incredible speed. It’s like a cruel survival match where if you don’t win, you die. I miss the old days: when I had a place to listen to the wind and to observe the leaves putting on new colors for the next season. I sometimes feel so lucky to have been through an age where computers and Internet wasn’t a part of our lives, where happiness in life come from every little detail and everybody knows everyone around them.

While I can be as sentimental as I please, the reality is that we can’t go back in time, at least I can’t for the moment. I still appreciate Yahoo! News a great deal and that’s what got me started on this blog today. This image above does not do justice to Tilt Cove but I dare say beauty is not a concern for any of the seven people residing there – in the smallest town in Canada. Disappearing Small Towns in Canada is an interesting series ran by Yahoo! Canada and I recommend it to all who care about Canada.

Isn’t it ironic? Most of us are trying to make it big in the super cities, Vancouver, Toronto, New York or whichever city people find exciting while people in small towns live a completely different kind of life. It’s the same kind of desire – wanting to have a better life. But is life really that much better in big cities? Is computer and Internet making us better people? Are we more selfish or open? Polite or rude? Good or evil? Sadly, I don’t have an answer and I might not care about the answer.

The entrepreneurial blood in me want to solve Tilt Cove’s problem, but my mind tells me otherwise: it’s the side effect that comes with evolution. More people reside on Earth than ever and it’s just a fierce competition anywhere you go. In China, workers migrant from rural areas to big cities like Shanghai and Beijing. In Canada, people relocate to Vancouver, Montreal or Toronto to make a living. The age of ¬†migration have arrived. People are shipping themselves to wherever they can live a better life and who can blame them for that?

However, I do not wish to see towns disappear in Canada. Aren’t we suppose to favor uniqueness more than uniformity. If everyone lives a similar life style, wouldn’t we become more boring as we go along in the history of evolution. People are being trained to survive fierce competitions but why can’t people be peaceful, be different and open-minded about differences? Wouldn’t this help human beings understand and appreciate each other better?

Like I said, I do not have an answer. But I’m glad enough to announce that I am not afraid of being different and I will remain clam in whatever I do. Life can be a speed race, but not for me. Details and value matters. People matter. There are people I truly care about and want to make myself available for wherever I go. Maybe some days I’ll become a mayor for a small town and stand by my choice! Life can be so unpredictable and may we all¬†find inner peace in ourselves, keep good values and adapt to changes as we grow.

 

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